Still Point Aikido Center

 

 

Handbook

4th Edition

 

Ross A. Robertson, Editor

 

 

 

 

Section I

 

Introduction to Aikido

 

The word aikido is a Japanese term which represents a synthesis of three concepts. Ai signifies harmony, blending, and the combination, coming together, or meeting of things. Ki represents the idea of

energy in its broadest possible interpretation. Do means road, path, or way, and is often used as a metaphor for one's life path, or more generally the way of the universe. The composite idea of aikido then is,

roughly, the way of harmonizing energies or of joined forces.

As a discipline, aikido is a system of self-defense which was developed to facilitate constructive conflict resolution. This is accomplished through respect for the opponent and application of techniques that

are designed to blend with an attack rather than stand in opposition to the force at hand. The result is more efficient use of energy and the avoidance of collision with a potentially harmful force.

Consequently, force may be neutralized without the necessity of greater strength or speed.

The practice of Aikido is non-competitive. Work-outs are frequently aerobic and are conducted in an atmosphere of cooperation. Benefits of practice are a greater sense of awareness, balance, coordination,

and confidence. Ultimately the conflict encountered in training is a metaphor for the conflicts we experience in daily lives, both internal and external, large and small.

 

Emergence of Aikido

 

Aikido was developed in Japan over the first several decades of the twentieth century. It's originator, Morihei Ueshiba, had as his aim to discover the true heart of budo ("martial way") that lies at the

foundation of all the warrior arts. Drawing from various disciplines such as kenjutsu, jujitsu, and sojutsu , Ueshiba synthesized a style of defensive technique which was unique in its economy and power.

At one point, however, Ueshiba's deeply religious nature led him to a profound revelation that completely altered his understanding of the role of the warrior in society. He saw in a single instant that true

budo is a manifestation of, as he put it, "the loving protection of all things." He spent the rest of his life furthering the development of what he would later call "aikido" with this new orientation in mind. In

his own time Ueshiba came to be known as O'Sensei , or great teacher, and this is how he is most often referred to today. Before his death in 1969 he made his wishes clear that aikido should continue to

develop in accordance with a vision of a peaceful coexistence among all people. Today, aikido is a dynamic, living tradition in which each participant has the potential to contribute their own energy toward

defining the shape of the art for the future.

 

Considerations for Practice

 

Below are some thoughts which are provided in the hopes of answering some questions about training at an aikido dojo (practice hall).

~Aikido training is done cooperatively. This means, among other things, a student will learn from and teach all other participants on the mat, no matter what the respective level of experience.

~Any class may range from being quiet and meditative to being full of dynamic energy. Staying flexible and keeping an open mind allows the student to get the most out of whatever the instructor is

presenting at that moment.

~Patience with oneself is necessary because aikido may not be learned as quickly as one might wish. Patience with others is also useful because they will seldom do exactly what is wanted of them. Good

humor becomes an essential survival tool when frustrations threaten balance and well-being.

~There is no upper limit to aikido. It is an open-ended system that may be developed throughout one's life. Regular practice facilitates good health and many choose to continue actively participating well into

their senior years.

~Training must always be realistic. This should not be confused with any expectations that one should be able to defeat all challengers in all situations. Rather, realistic training means practicing one step at a

time with intelligence, purpose, and awareness. Certainly we are striving to make our techniques effective for self-defense, but we must begin with the acceptance that no amount of training will make us

invincible.

~Although we train for harmony in our lives both on and off the mat, and while this training is structured to be enjoyable, some minor physical discomforts are to be expected. We are, after all, training to

stretch ourselves to do things beyond that to which we are normally accustomed. Additionally, we train very intimately with other individuals who are struggling to master difficult and non- intuitive concepts.

Frustrations and misunderstandings are to be expected and, so far as possible, incorporated into the overall learning experience.

~All of the basics of aikido can be learned in the first few classes. Beyond the basics is a vast pool of techniques and variations which threaten to overwhelm the beginner and the advanced student alike. The

fact that, beyond the basics, we do not generally proceed in any sort of systematic, linear program may be very off-putting to many people, as it is often difficult to gauge whether or not any progress is being

made. Even so, with regular practice the most important aspects of one's development are advancing steadily, usually just outside of immediate awareness. There is an order to training, but it will be more of

a hidden organic process than that of an obvious building up of a readily discernible structure. Everyone develops along completely unique lines according to their own nature. Generally, though, you may

expect long periods of gestation followed by brief periods of rapid visible growth.

~All of one's resources must be brought to bear in training. The aim of the group is to cultivate an environment which is safe, fun, and conducive to growth. However, the ultimate quality of experience is

entirely the responsibility of each individual.

 

General Information About Still Point

 

Fees : This is a membership organization which functions on a dues basis. Dues are paid monthly and are to be paid at the first class of each month. Beginners joining in the middle of a month will be

pro-rated to the end of the month. Afterward it is the responsibility of each student to attend classes as there will be no refund or credit forwarded for missed classes. Any payment on or after the 10th of the

month will be considered late. Chronic late payments may result in the student being dropped from the roster and placed at the end of the waiting list. Any student who has difficulty meeting the financial

obligation for training should contact the chief instructor to see if special arrangements can be made. It is not our intent to exclude anyone with sincere interest in training merely because of economic

difficulties. Final decision is at the discression of Still Point.

 

Leaves of Absence : Individuals wishing to take an extended leave of absence (two weeks or more) may avoid paying dues for that time by submitting advanced notice to the instructor (at least two weeks)

The student will remain on the roster provided that they continue to communicate their intentions on a monthly basis, for a period of up to three months. In all cases, if a period of more than three months

passes without receipt of dues, the student will be dropped from the roster and placed at the end of the waiting list unless special arrangements are made.

 

Waiting Lists : Classes have a maximum capacity determined by available mat space. For classes where maximum capacity has been reached, waiting lists will be formed for interested new students as well

as old students that have been dropped from the roster for any reason.

Termination of Membership : Members who wish to be removed from the roster should give notice so as to avoid accrual of membership debt. If no notice is given, the name will remain on the roster for

three months and dues will continue to be charged during that time. Re-admittance will then be contingent upon getting current on past due obligations

 

Hidden Costs : Although a uniform is not required, most students eventually choose to purchase a karate-style workout uniform or gi , and possibly even a hakama , the skirt-like pants that are peculiar to a

few of the Japanese arts. Prices and quality vary a great deal, so shop around. Otherwise, plan on wearing any rugged, loose-fitting clothes in which you feel comfortable. Insofar as part of our training

includes defenses against armed attacks, you may eventually decide to purchase a jo (short staff), bokken (Japanese wooden sword), or tanto (wooden knife). Again, these are optional. Also, during the

course of the year there usually are a number of seminars held around the city and state which you may wish to attend. However, our curriculum does not require attendance to any of these. Finally, there is a

cost associated with affiliation dues, and tests and ranking which are discussed below.

 

Affiliation : There are a number of different schools of aikido throughout the world, each placing a different emphasis on various aspects of the art. Our affiliation is with Seidokan and we follow the

principles of its founder, Rod Kobayashi. Briefly stated, the emphasis of Seidokan is toward the realistic continued development of aikido according to the principles established by O'Sensei, and the

relevance of the art to a modern way of life. Our dojo collects $15.00 per year from each of its students to go toward the affiliation dues and acquisition of training aids such as books or videos.

 

Rank : For adults, there are six levels of kyu (levels below black belt) which are awarded through an examination process. Children have ten kyu levels. Students will be tested periodically for their next level.

Testing is done in the spirit of self-examination and assessment of what has been learned and of what is still to come. Students are only competing against themselves and are not compared to each other nor

to any set of rigid standards. There are no test fees at this level. However, at the level of black belt there are test fees which are set and collected by Seidokan Headquarters. As these costs are not

inconsiderable, ask about the current rate well before you expect to be promoted to that level.

 

Other Services : We offer special programs to interested groups. Companies and organizations that would like to host an aikido demonstration, lecture, workshop, or on-sight aikido program may contact us

to make arrangements. Fees will vary depending upon the service provided. For those who are internet-enabled, a Still Point World Wide Web site and both Seidokan and Still Point email lists are available.

 

Expectations : Students deserve to know what is expected of them. Beyond dues obligations, members are expected to attend regularly, to help with dojo maintainence, to work toward the growth and

betterment of the dojo, and to contribute ideas and talents. Students are asked to recognize that we are not a utility service, where you pay a bill and then turn on your aikido faucet. Rather, we are a

community working together for a common aim with diverse resources. Each of us must continually ask, "Why do these people want me among them? What can I do better so they will most gladly want to

help me?" When the individual contributes to a group that values input and innovation, then an environment is created which can better serve the well-being of all of its members.

 

Dojo Etiquette

 

As with any system of etiquette, the guidelines for good manners in aikido stem from a basic respect for other people and for one's environment. In addition, these gestures also tend to serve a secondary

purpose, that of establishing a group identity and maintaining a sense of continuity through tradition. Accordingly, different groups may be expected to have different sets of manners. Our own group, for

example, tends to be very informal in its proceedings but still uses certain signs of respect for the Japanese origin and influence on the art. What follows is an outline of behavior which will hopefully aid the

beginner in acclimatizing to the seemingly strange conduct of the group.

 

Bowing : When entering or leaving the practice room, and when stepping on or off the mat, bow toward the shomen , or front of the room. Remove your shoes before stepping onto the mat, as we spend a

great deal of time in very close contact with it and therefore appreciate its cleanliness. At the beginning and end of each class, we bow as a group toward the shomen, and then students and sensei (instructor)

bow to each other in mutual respect. Also, during practice we bow to our partner before and after we have worked with them, and to the instructor after he or she demonstrates a technique.

 

Mats : Before and after class, the mats may need to be spread out or folded and stored. The mats should always be swept clean before each practice and it is the responsibility of one of the senior students to

see to it that it gets done. However, everyone should pitch in where possible.

 

Arriving Late and Leaving Early : When coming into a class already in session, bow in quietly, wait for the instructor's acknowledgment, then stretch out on your own until you are safely warmed-up

enough to join in with the group. If you need to step outside the room for any reason or if you must leave practice early, bow out quietly. Notify the instructor, as he or she may otherwise be left wondering if

the student left because of an injury or some other incident which the instructor should know about.

Safety : Each student should take responsibility for their own safety and that of others. If you notice any unsafe conditions such as gaps or rips in the mats, or the presence of blood on the mats (see

appendix), notify the instructor.

 

Hygiene : Since the practice of aikido is a very intimate art, the need for personal hygiene will no doubt be obvious to everyone. Less obvious perhaps, are the hazards that jewelry and long nails on the hands

and feet pose to one's self and one's partners. Please keep the nails trimmed and if possible remove all jewelry, especially earrings, watches, and bracelets, before training.

 

Observing : While the instructor is demonstrating a technique or discussing a concept, the student is asked to either sit seiza (the formal posture of sitting on the knees and ankles) or to sit cross-legged

with the back straight. This is not purely an issue of "good form" or even of being in a rigid "at attention" posture. Rather, these positions naturally promote a state of alertness and are structurally conducive

to teaching the body how to support itself. Also, in an atmosphere where an error in technique could land someone squarely in your lap, "lounging" attitudes are necessarily prohibited.

 

This list should suffice to help the beginner feel more at ease during their first visits to our dojo. It may not, however, prepare you for a visit to a more formal, highly traditional dojo. In any situation where

you are visiting another dojo, watch carefully and imitate as best as you can the actions of the resident students. Take no offense just because their manners are different from what you are accustomed.

When dealing with others in another dojo or within our own, it is useful to remember that we are all training toward a better understanding of harmony and not to expect that we should have already mastered

its every nuance. If we had, there would be no reason to train.

 

 

 

 

Section II

 

Aikido Terms

 

Attacks

Strikes

Shomen-uchi..............................Vertical strike to forehead

Yokomen-uchi............................Circular strike to side of head

Mune-tsuki.................................Straight thrust to the solar-plexus

Grabs (from front)

Katate-tori..................................Wrist grab with one hand

Katate-kosa-dori.........................Cross-handed wrist grab with one hand

Ryote-dori...................................Both wrists are seized

Ryote-mochi...............................Wrist grab with two hands

Kata-dori....................................Shoulder or lapel grab

(from rear)

Ushiro-dori..................................Bear hug

Ushiro-tekubi-dori.......................Both wrists grabbed

Ushiro-ryo-kata-dori...................Both shoulders grabbed

Ushiro-hiji-dori............................Elbows grabbed

Ushiro-ude-tori............................Elbows pulled back, linked with attacker's arms

Ushiro-kubishime.........................Choke

Ushiro-tekubi-tori-kubishime.....One wrist held and choke with free arm

Responses

Ikkyo............................................ First technique, forward arm-twist lead

Nikyo........................................... Second technique, wrist compression lead

Sankyo......................................... Third technique, forward wrist-twist lead

Yonkyo......................................... Fourth technique, forearm lead

Gokyo.......................................... Fifth technique, forward arm-twist lead with reversed grip

Kote-Gaeshi................................. Reverse wrist compression lead

Tenchi-Nage............................... Heaven and earth throw

Shiho-Nage................................. Four-direction throw

Kaiten-Nage................................ Wheel throw

Makiotoshi.................................. Spiral drop

Hijiotoshi..................................... Elbow drop

Enkei-Nage.................................. Draw into a small circle

Sudori.......................................... To pass through, usually by dropping under the attack

Kokyu-Nage................................ Breath throw, to effortlessly lead the attacker's balance

Kokyu-Dosa................................ Seated exercise to practice blending with a partner

 

 

 

 

This list is not comprehensive. Please see the official Seidokan Glossary for more. Aiki Taiso

 

The aiki-taiso are a set of exercises which are designed to acquaint the body with some of the fundamental movements and geometries which comprise the waza (defense techniques). As such, they

represent basic building blocks in aikido's physical vocabulary.

 

1. Kotegaeshi-undo......................................... Wrist stretch: fingers up, thumb out

2. Nikyo-undo................................................. Wrist stretch: thumb down, fingers toward elbow

3. Sankyo-undo............................................... Wrist stretch: thumb down, palm out

4. Funekogi-undo............................................ Boat-rowing exercise

5. Shomen-uchi-ikkyo-undo........................... Swinging arms to protect face

6. Zengo-undo................................................. Shomen-uchi-ikkyo-undo with 180 turn

7. Happo-undo................................................ Eight-directions

8. Tekubi-kosa-undo....................................... Wrist-crossing exercise

9. Tekubi-joho-kosa-undo.............................. Cross Palms near front of face

10. Enkei-undo................................................ Hand-circle near hara

11. Enkei-choyaku-undo................................ Enkei-undo with step

12. Sayu-enkei-undo...................................... Enkei-undo turning sideways

13. Sayu-undo................................................. Sideways lead

14. Sayu-choyaku-undo................................. Sayu-undo with step

15. Ude-furi-undo........................................... Arm-swinging

16. Ude-furi-choyaku-undo............................ Ude-furi with step and turn

17. Ushiro-dori-zenpo-nage-undo................ Rear-attack forward blending

18. Ushiro-tekubi-tori-zenshin-nage-undo.... Step forward and bow

19. Ushiro-tekubi-tori-kotai-undo................. Step sideways and bow

20. Kokyu-ho-tenkan-undo............................ Breath/turn exercise

21. Ukemi........................................................ Tumbling Practice

Zenpo-kaiten-undo............................. Forward rolls

Koho-kaiten-undo............................... Backward rolls

 

 

 

 

Section III

 

Principles of Aikido

Editor's note: The following are a set of essential ideas from which flow all of the aikido techniques as well as aikido philosophy.

 

True Victory is Victory Over Oneself

One must first learn to control oneself before attempting to harmonize and control others. Without a good balance and control of oneself, one can neither avoid an attack nor apply an effective technique on

others. It is through self-control that one can learn to enjoy a harmonious way of life.

 

Principle of Oneness

In order to harmonize with the laws of nature, we must first learn to develop and maintain the right attitude of training. We must always keep the attitude of becoming one with every situation. This is an

attitude of respect for all things at all times. Regardless of the situation, friend or foe, one must always be ready to harmonize. The right attitude greatly affects the efficiency of the action. It is not how strong,

but rather how correct you are that counts. This concept of oneness will make it possible for anyone regardless of age or sex to perform the arts efficiently.

 

Principle of Circular Motion

The spiritual circle is the foundation of all Aikido techniques. Circular movement synthesizes everything and can freely resolve all problems. The innermost study of the circular motion is to develop new

techniques from the center of the circle. Aikido techniques are combinations of circular movements. Regardless of the ways the opponent attacks, linear or angular, a circular motion centered at your lower

abdomen, hara, will naturally blend with the attack so that you can execute a controlling art with efficiency. The centripetal force will draw the opponent into your range of effectiveness so that the centrifugal

force can eject him effectively. All circular motions are preceded by a spiritual circle. The spiritual circle is the circle drawn within one's mind before the execution of the physical circle.

 

Range of Effectiveness

The best way to defend yourself against an attack is to get out of the opponent's range of effectiveness. You can step off the line of force, move out of the opponent's radius of reach or step inside of the

circle of attack. However, in order to be able to control an attacker, one must remain well within his/her own range of effectiveness at the same time he/she is moving out of the attacker's range of

effectiveness. Barely reaching the attacker will not give the defender full advantage for he/she will be over extended and off balance. Being too close to the attacker could also hinder one's effectiveness.

Depending on the situation, one must learn to realize the range of effectiveness of that moment.

 

Principle of Ki

Ki is the force behind all things. Everything in the universe has Ki. Ki is the essence of our world. It is the basis of all matter, every phenomenon, emotion, sense, direction, will, consciousness and

conscience. Ki is also an energy which can be very useful in our daily lives when used properly. Ki is our life force which keeps us alive. Ki is the binding force of our mind and body. We can be very

efficient if we unify our mind and body. However, it is rather difficult to maintain the oneness of mind and body throughout our daily lives without something to bind them together. As electricity keeps the

computer and the robot working together, Ki keeps the mind and the body working in oneness.

 

The Principles to Unify Mind and Body

 

Keep One-Point

Calmly let your mind settle at an imaginary point about two inches below the navel.

 

Controlled Relaxation

Relax your entire body to the point where you are able to maintain complete control of yourself by keeping calmness of mind and body between tenseness and limpness.

 

Settle Down

Naturally allow the gravitational pull to settle your entire body down to where it should settle.

 

Let Your Ki Flow

To think positively and be ready for action with a calm and flexible mind without referring to excessive physical strength. A positive attitude toward life.

 

Reprinted from "Introduction to Aikido," by Rod T. Kobayashi

 

 

 

Guidelines For Effective Aikido

 

CONTROL YOURSELF. Good aikido is based upon understanding and controlling the mind & body together as a unit. Controlling yourself is the key to learning how to have an effect on someone else.

"Doing" to someone else is secondary, what you are doing to yourself is much more important.

 

MAINTAIN BALANCE. Head up, eyes looking at the horizon. Shoulders aligned with and stacked directly above the hips. Feet in a natural "waiting for the bus" stance.

 

USING THE BODY AS A UNIT . Use all of your body as one unified whole. Spreading the work out evenly, allowing the stronger parts of your body (hips) to do more work directly in proportion to their

capabilities is best. This is easy to do if you are already balanced. Tension can be a sign that one part of the body is working out of proportion with the rest.

 

USE YOUR BODY NATURALLY. This is an easy balanced posture, accomplished by keeping shoulders and elbows down, head up. When you're moving, motions such as letting arms swing in a natural

arc, bending slightly at the elbows are best. Your body evolved to respect gravity. Using movements which harmonize with your body design are the most effective in aikido.

 

EXTEND YOUR MIND. The power within your body is controlled by the mental attitude that you develop. Moving forward physically follows looking forward mentally in the direction you wish to go.

Extending your mind first in the direction you want to go allows your body to find the natural movement in that directions. If your mind balks or stops at an obstacle, so will your body. When you extend

your mind to look beyond the immediate difficulty or obstacle, your body can easily find a way to follow.

 

BE CALM. Allow both body and mind to become calm as you are practicing aikido. If your mind balks or gets upset because of something your body is or isn't doing, take a deep breath and focus your

mental energy beyond the immediate mental block. Easily moving through any attitude that might have prevented you from practicing most effectively, you will find ways to allow calmness.

 

HAVE CONFIDENCE. Confidence grows with experience, acknowledge this as a goal at whatever level you are currently practicing. (Some people say in order to do something very well it is necessary to

do it very badly first!) All of the above rules fall into place most effectively when you practice with confidence. Confidence comes from being aware of your ability to continually learn, and to give yourself

credit for all of your accomplishments. By deciding to practice feeling confidence in yourself as you practice aikido an awareness of the necessary mental balance needed to accomplish the techniques will

evolve.

 

NOTE: These first seven rules deal with the most important concern of aikido, learning how to control your own body/self.

 

The next five rules deal with how to use this self/body control to deal with another person.

MINIMIZE THE CONFLICT. Finding the easiest path to your goal minimizes the conflict. Going around someone else's strength is most effective. Always go around, usually there are ways to do this,

finding them is possible when you try.

 

WORK WITHIN YOUR RANGE OF EFFECTIVENESS. Closer to your body, within the easy range of your own arms is better. The stomach-hips region (hara ) is the center of your strength and

ability. Always move as close to your own hara as possible. Conversely, moving your opponent (uke ) outside of their own range increases the effectiveness of your techniques. This is one way to practice

the preceding rule. Learning how to lead uke's mind to move their body is the most important aspect of learning the martial art techniques.

 

TAKE THE SLACK OUT. Making the appropriate areas of your body pull taut like a rope assures that the power from your hara can be effectively delivered directly into your arms. Taking the slack out of

uke's body allows this power to affect them more efficiently.

 

THINK DOWN. Make gravity your ally. Allow the natural pull of gravity to assist you as you move. Most aikido techniques involve putting uke down. In some cases a compromise is reached between

moving plain old straight down and moving around the conflict (see above). Learning the balance between these two motions is part of what makes aikido an art.

 

KEEP YOUR MIND FREE. Look forward to where you would like to go, extending your mind ahead of you. Controlling yourself is more important than "throwing" uke, keeping this in mind will greatly

increase your proficiency. Remember that uke is there to help you learn the technique, and that your goal is to concentrate on your own self/body control. Let uke's presence remind you of this goal, not

capture your attention.

 

by Rod T. Kobayashi

 

 

 

 

Appendix

 

Reminders in Aikido Practice

 

1. Aikido decides life and death in a single strike, so students must carefully follow the instructor's teaching and not compete to see who is the strongest.

 

2. Aikido is the way that teaches how one can deal with several enemies. Students must train themselves to be alert not just to the front but to all sides and the back.

 

3. Training should always be conducted in a pleasant and joyful atmosphere.

 

4. The instructor teaches only one small aspect of the art. Its versatile applications must be discovered by each student through incessant practice and training.

 

5. In daily practice first begin by moving your body and them progress to more intensive practice. Never force anything unnaturally or unreasonably. If this rule is followed, then even elderly people will not

hurt themselves and they can train in a pleasant and joyful atmosphere.

 

6. The purpose of aikido is to train mind and body and to produce sincere, earnest people. Since all techniques are to be transmitted person-to-person, do not randomly reveal them to others, for this might

lead to their being used inappropriately.

 

-Morihei Ueshiba (ca. 1935)

 

 

 

The goal of training in the martial arts is to overcome six kinds of disease,

 

...the desire for victory, the desire to rely on technical cunning, the desire to show off, the desire to psychologically overwhelm the opponent, the desire to remain passive in order to wait for an opening, and

the desire to become free of these desires.

 

-Yagyu Munenori

 

 

Systems

 

My belief is that all political activity directed towards changing the means of working, is ineffective without a change in our way of working, and that this is essentially personal. If we change our way of

doing things, structural change necessarily follows. If we wish for this personal change we need discipline, and the only effective discipline is self-discipline. External discipline, ie; control, the normal

direction of authoritarian agencies, generates an at least equal reaction. Control efficiency, multiplied by technology and directed to externals, can only breed de-control at an increasing rate. This is not

necessary and even less is it inevitable, and the movement away from this trend must be gradual and initially personal.

 

................................................................................ ..........................................

I

i) One can work within any structure.

ii) Once one can work within any structure, some structures are more efficient than others.

iii) There is no one structure which is universally appropriate.

iv) Commitment to an aim within an inappropriate structure will give rise to the creation of an appropriate structure.

v) Apathy, ie passive commitment, within an appropriate structure will effect its collapse.

vi) Dogmatic attachment to the supposed merits of a particular structure hinders the search for an appropriate structure.

vii) There will be difficulty defining the appropriate structure because it will always be mobile, ie in process.

II

i) There should be no difficulty in defining aim.

ii) The appropriate structure will recognize structures outside itself.

iii) The appropriate structure can work within any large structure.

iv) Once the appropriate structure can work within any large structure, some larger structures are more efficient than others.

v) There is no larger structure which is universally appropriate.

vi) Commitment to an aim by an appropriate structure within a larger, inappropriate structure will give rise to a large, appropriate structure.

vii) The quantitative structure is affected by qualitative action.

III

i) Qualitative action is not bound by number.

ii) Any small unit committed to qualitative action can affect radical change on a scale outside its quantitative measure.

iii) Quantitative action works by violence and breeds reaction.

iv) Qualitative action works by example and invites reciprocation.

v) Reciprocation between independent structures is a framework of interacting units which is itself a structure.

vi) Any appropriate structure of interacting units can work within any other structure of interacting units.

vii) Once this is so, some structures of interacting units are more efficient than others.

 

Robert Fripp

from "Let the Power Fall"

 

 

Blood Borne Pathogen Policy

 

To protect the dojo family against disease, the Dojo has adopted the following policy intended to minimize the risk of transmutation of HIV, Hepatitis-B and other blood borne pathogens during training

activities. Current available medical evidence suggests that the risk of transmission of HIV during the type of contact that occurs in Aikido training is extremely slight. Organizations such as the NCAA, the

National Academy of Pediatrics Committee on sports Medicine, and the U.S. Olympic Committee have concurred that persons affected with blood-borne pathogens, particularly HIV, should not be bared

from participating in contact sports. Certain federal and state anti-discrimination laws may also prohibit such a ban. These organizations have also concluded that the already slight risk of transmission of

HIV, and other blood-borne pathogen diseases can be reduced further by the adoption of the Center for Disease Control-recommended "Universal Precautions".

This Dojo will observe these "Universal Precautions". Generally this means that instructors and persons training in this dojo shall treat all exposed body fluids as if they were infected. Specifically, the

following measures will be observed at all times.

 

1. If you have any open cuts or sores, you must clean them with a suitable antiseptic and cover them securely with a leakproof dressing before coming onto the mat. Make sure that they stay covered while

you are training. If your hands or feet have broken skin, suitable gloves or tabi may be worn to cover these areas. If you notice that someone else has an open cut or sore remind them of their obligation

before training with that person.

 

2. If a bleeding wound, even a minor one, occurs during training the person bleeding shall immediately stop training and leave the mat until the bleeding stops and the wound is securely covered. Immediate

measures shall be taken to stop the bleeding. If the person needs assistance with this then each person assisting shall wear a pair of latex gloves (which are available in the dojo first aid kit). Hands shall be

washed with soap and hot water immediately after gloves are removed. All used gloves, bloody dressings and rags, etc shall be placed in a leakproof plastic bag provided for that purpose. All contaminated

items should be disposed of carefully. Minor bloodstains on Gi should be treated with a disinfectant provided for this purpose. If there are major blood stains the Gi shall be removed as soon as possible,

placed into a leakproof container and handled carefully until it can be laundered or disposed of.

 

3. If you come into contact with the blood of another you shall immediately stop training, leave the training area and wash the exposed area thoroughly with soap and hot water before returning.

 

4. If blood is present on the mat, the training partner of the person bleeding shall insure that no one inadvertently comes into contact with the blood. The blood should be cleaned up as soon as possible by

wiping the exposed service with a disinfectant solution provided for this purpose. Each person assisting with this task shall put on a pair of latex gloves and shall wash their hands with soap and hot water

immediately after the gloves are removed. It is preferable however that the person bleeding clean their own blood. Bloody rags and used gloves shall be disposed of as set out in Paragraph 2.

 

Finally there are other disease and illnesses aside from those transmitted through blood. You are reminded that you are responsible for not only your own health and safety but the health and safety of others

with whom you train. If you know or suspect that you have any illness or disease which might infect others refrain from training until you are no

longer a risk to others. This self-defense and consideration of yourself and your fellow Budoka is your responsibility and part of your training. It is embodied in the spirit of the Budo we study.

 

Dennis Hooker Sensei

 

 

 

 

1998 Still Point Aikido Center. All rights reserved.

Where other authorship is indicated, those authors retain their respective rights.